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Because I’m such a l33t h4xx0r, I figured out how to “click” on the “DENY” button when you’re trying to deny a PayPal payment.  eBay forces you to “Accept” any form of payment sent via PayPal, even if the auction in question is in dispute, as in my case where I accidentally listed a $120 LCD for $21 and it “sold.”  The listing was wrong, but the buyer had issued payment already.  The listing wasn’t the problem anymore, but disposing of the issued payment so the buyer could get the funds back wasn’t possible, without accepting and refunding, losing a couple of bucks in the process.  The “Deny” button is grayed out.  Luckily, PayPal’s programming team aren’t all that bright, because they failed to build a basic check into the system when the change was made: the validation of what “accept” is set to against the payment’s status.  Because of this glaring programming error, as of this writing you can deny payments that eBay wants to force you to accept.

So, if you’re trying to deny a payment but PayPal won’t let you, here’s the trick.

  1. Right-click on the “Accept” button.  Copy the link location (Firefox) or copy the shortcut (Internet Explorer).
  2. Clear out the address bar in your browser, then right-click and paste the URL into it, but DO NOT HIT ENTER OR GO YET.
  3. You’ll see a section of the URL labeled “&accept=yes” which you need to edit to say “&accept=no” instead.
  4. Hit Enter or click Go.  You should be taken to the “Are you sure you want to deny this payment?” screen.
  5. Confirm the denial of the payment.  That’s it!

Be aware that eBay’s policy is that you MUST accept eBay auction payments if issued through PayPal, even if it’s a credit card payment that’ll hit you with a 4.9% transaction fee.  I don’t agree with this policy, but at the same time you’re the one risking termination of your account(s) if you cancel your transaction against the rules.   In my case, the auction was bad, therefore the payment was also bad, and I don’t see how it can violate the policy if the underlying auction is not valid.

It’s a neat little trick nevertheless.  If you’re trying to deny a payment issued through PayPal, this can help.

eBay’s attempts to force PayPal down their users’ throats is reprehensible in any case, and I’m starting to get tired of reading about PayPal accounts being suspended for no reason and money being denied to the rightful owners of that money.  See PayPalSucks.com if you’re interested in this topic further.

UPDATE: THIS IS NOT ABOUT THE UNDER-$200 NETBOOK WITH WINDOWS CE, WHICH IS A TOTAL PIECE OF JUNK. Please don’t ask me about those. They’re junk.

My Sylvania G netbook.

My Sylvania G netbook.

If the tips in this entry help you, please send me an E-mail message letting me know!  I GREATLY appreciate feedback!

A lot of professional reviewers out there seem to have nothing but bad comments on the original (non-Meso) Sylvania G netbook.  I bought one of these puppies for $300 and felt like I was getting quite the steal.  Then again, I’m a Linux user, so I feel more “at home” with a Linux laptop (though my primary line of work is obviously fixing all the problems under Microsoft’s OS every day of my life).  I love my Sylvania G.  It’s tiny, light, the battery lasts forever, people look at it and think I’m watching a DVD on a portable DVD player rather than computing, its wireless actually works far better than I expected…the list goes on.  Granted, it lacks some software that I’d like, but for its primary purposes (Internet browsing, light office apps, maybe an MP3 here and there), it does the job beautifully.  I wish it had all the shortcuts to all the control panels available, but they’re not there because the 800×480 WVGA screen can’t handle them vertically; I’ll tell you how to bypass the vertical issue in a minute.

The main reason I’m writing this is not to explain why my G is so awesome, but rather how to make it that way.  The number one complaint about the G is its postage-stamp sized mouse trackpad, and believe it or not, the laptop comes with the tools needed to fix the insane acceleration that it comes with by default (no more “buy a USB mouse if you’re going to buy this laptop” complaints!)  The biggest advantage of the G over the practically identical Everex Cloudbook (which the G is basically a rebranded version of) is that unlike the Cloudbook, with its moronic “mouse buttons on the left side of the unit, mouse trackpad on the right” layout, the G has the touchpad assembly below the keyboard, WITH THE BUTTONS IMMEDIATELY BESIDE THE PAD.  That leaves the excessive tracking speed (where you can just lift your finger off the pad and the mouse moves two inches across the seven-inch LCD) as the only remaining issue, and HERE IS HOW TO FIX THE SYLVANIA G NETBOOK POINTER TRACKING SPEED, STEP BY STEP!

(This section has been moved to the Tritech Computer Solutions page called Sylvania G Netbook Tips and Tricks.)

For $300, and with my tips above, the original Sylvania G is an absolute gem.  You simply can’t beat its value unless you drop another $100 on an Acer Aspire One (what I originally wanted but couldn’t justify purchasing.)  Once you slow down the mouse and add some launchers for some helpful applications, the G starts to look far better than it may have on display in the store.  I don’t know about the Meso, but I don’t care, because I’ve found the perfect laptop for my needs and that’s the end of the story!  I absolutely LOVE my G!

Once again, please send me feedback if this helps you out!

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